BlueBorne Vulnerability

This week, it was discovered that there was a nasty collection of vulnerabilities that impact devices with Bluetooth connectivity. Armis Labs had discovered this attack vector was present on all major consumer operating systems (Windows, Linux, iOS, Android) no matter what type of device it is (desktop, laptop, smartphone, tablet, wearable, IoT). If you have a device with Bluetooth (except those using only Bluetooth Low Energy) that’s running an unpatched version of the software then it is vulnerable to BlueBorne. BlueBorne is a new malware that targets devices via Bluetooth and over five billion such devices globally are at risk.

Regardless of the security features on your device, the only way to completely prevent attackers from exploiting your device is to power off your device’s Bluetooth function when you’re not using it. Not putting it into an invisible or undetectable mode.

BlueBorne vulnerabilities are tracked under the following identifiers: CVE-2017-0781, CVE-2017-0782, CVE-2017-0783, and CVE-2017-0785 for Android devices; CVE-2017-1000251 and CVE-2017-1000250 for Linux; CVE-2017-14315 for iOS, and CVE-2017-8628 on Windows. Three of these eight security flaws are rated critical and according to researchers at Armis — the IoT security company that discovered BlueBorne — they allow attackers to take over devices and execute malicious code, or to run Man-in-the-Middle attacks and intercept Bluetooth communications.

Furthermore, the vulnerabilities can be concocted into a self-spreading BlueTooth worm that could wreak havoc inside a company’s network or even across the world.

Google patched the flaws in its September Android Security Bulletin.

Windows versions since Windows Vista are all affected. Microsoft said Windows phones are not impacted by BlueBorne. Microsoft secretly released patches in July for CVE-2017-8628, but only today included details about the fixed vulnerability in September’s Patch Tuesday.

All Linux devices running BlueZ are affected by an information leak, while all Linux devices from version 3.3-rc1 (released in October 2011) are affected by a remote code execution flaw that can be exploited via Bluetooth. Samsung’s Tizen OS, based on Linux, is also affected.

All iPhone, iPad and iPod touch devices with iOS 9.3.5 and lower, and AppleTV devices with version 7.2.2 and lower are affected, but the issue was patched in iOS 10.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>